Almost half of the world’s population faces a scarcity of water.

Statistics / Introduction:
Water use has grown at more than twice the rate of the population for the past century. Although there is not yet a global water shortage, about 2.8 billion people, representing more than 40 per cent of the world’s population, live in river basins with some form of water scarcity.

More than 1.2 billion of them live under conditions of physical water scarcity, which occurs when more than 75 per cent of the river flows are withdrawn. Northern Africa and Western Asia are seriously compromised, as are some regions within large countries such as China and India. Symptoms include environmental degradation and competition for water.

Another 1.6 billion people live in areas of economic water scarcity, where human, institutional and financial capital limit access to water, even though water in nature is available locally to meet human demands.

These conditions are prevalent in much of Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Symptoms include lack of or underdeveloped water infrastructure, high vulnerability to short- and long-term drought, and difficult access to reliable water supplies, especially for rural people.

Millions of people in Africa are stricken with preventable diseases every year because they lack what the developed world takes for granted — clean drinking water.

Africa is one of the most water-impoverished regions … and the lack of clean water claims the lives of 4,900 children every day.

More than one child in sub-Saharan Africa dies every minute from diarrheal disease — a direct result of inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

Humanitarian: Field Studies

A Desperate Cry
Almost half of the world’s population faces a scarcity of water

Statistics / Introduction:
Water use has grown at more than twice the rate of the population for the past century. Although there is not yet a global water shortage, about 2.8 billion people, representing more than 40 per cent of the world’s population, live in river basins with some form of water scarcity.

More than 1.2 billion of them live under conditions of physical water scarcity, which occurs when more than 75 per cent of the river flows are withdrawn. Northern Africa and Western Asia are seriously compromised, as are some regions within large countries such as China and India. Symptoms include environmental degradation and competition for water.

Another 1.6 billion people live in areas of economic water scarcity, where human, institutional and financial capital limit access to water, even though water in nature is available locally to meet human demands.

These conditions are prevalent in much of Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Symptoms include lack of or underdeveloped water infrastructure, high vulnerability to short- and long-term drought, and difficult access to reliable water supplies, especially for rural people.

Millions of people in Africa are stricken with preventable diseases every year because they lack what the developed world takes for granted — clean drinking water.

Africa is one of the most water-impoverished regions … and the lack of clean water claims the lives of 4,900 children every day.

More than one child in sub-Saharan Africa dies every minute from diarrheal disease — a direct result of inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

MegaCARE’s Clean Water Program Makes a Difference in the Rift Valley

MegaCARE dug water wells in West Pokot district of Kenya. The people in West Pokot were walking 17 kilometers one way in order to obtain contaminated water for their families. Our C.E.O. informed us of the conflict between two tribes in the Rift Valley over water. His statement was, “Surely, there must be a solution to this problem.”

The Rift Valley is a place that rarely gets any rain. Two tribes live in the Valley, the Maasai Tribe and the Kikuyu tribe. The Massai are nomadic and work with their livestock while the Kikuyu are agriculturist and have farms. When the drought season hits the livestock need the water from the pond and the Kikuyu would take the water for irrigation.

In March of 2005 a war broke out between the two tribes which was a common occurrence. With bows and arrows, spears and machetes, 80 people were killed and over 100 families displaced due to fighting and burning of homes. The government tried several times to gather the leaders together but each
time it became so volatile they had to disperse.

MegaCARE was able to gather the Chiefs and Elders of both tribes. Through collaboration a solution was developed to end the conflict. The solution was to dig three wells in strategic areas. One well in Kikuyu territory, one well in Maasai territory and a third well for villages miles away that would hear about water closer to them. Geologists were hired and decided on the location for drilling.

The first well was dry after digging down about 600 feet. The second well made steam come out of the ground and the third location destroyed the tools with underground lava. We moved our rig back to the mountain and hit a super well. In order to reach the tribes we had to dig a 12 kilometer pipeline. We could have hired a machine with an operator to dig the line. However, we hired 100 men both Maasai and Kikuyu from the villages and gave them jobs. From both tribes a water committee was selected by the people and trained for one year to service and care for the pipeline and its machinery.

The Kenyan government is now using this pipeline as a standard model for their country. The greatest part of the story takes place on the day of dedication. Once the water station was complete a day was set aside to dedicate it and give it completely to the people. As thousands gathered to rejoice over the water, the Chiefs from both tribes approached MegaCARE stating, “We would like to make a covenant of peace on the day of the dedication. As we speak this covenant out our people will honor it and our children will honor it.”

It was a wonderful dedication, the pipeline supplies water to about 20 thousand people, 1 million goats and sheep, 400 thousand head of cattle, wild life and crops, and the tribes are living in peace.

Due to clean water the people are healthier, the women can stay home with their young and the children can get an education because they do not have to spend their day carrying water for 20 kilometers one way.

Your support of MegaCARE is making a difference.